July 29, 2014, is the 60th anniversary of the first edition of The Fellowship of the Ring. (some say it was the 24th, some the 29th)

July 29, 2014, is the 60th anniversary of the first edition of The Fellowship of the Ring. (some say it was the 24th, some the 29th)

nprbooks:

It’s time for Friday Reads! I’m thinking it’s time for a re-read of Barbara Tuchman’s classic history The Guns of August

Team Member Rose isn’t sure yet how she feels about A Brief History of Seven Killings.

Intern Nicole has The Shadow Hero, Gene Luen Yang’s new take on the Green Turtle, the first Asian-American superhero.

And Mama Susan Stambergis reading An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood.

How about you?

— Petra

Entertaining action / adventure heroine of the sort we lately only seem to turn up in the paranormal adventure genre, only here science fiction. 

awesomepeoplereading:

King reads.
groveatlanticinc:

This is fabulous.
wordpainting:

Bestselling writer Stephen King reading in the middle of a Red Sox baseball game. His team, the Red Sox, were losing, so he made the best of that time. The book he’s reading is Kate Atkinson’s book, When Will There Be Good News?

awesomepeoplereading:

King reads.

groveatlanticinc:

This is fabulous.

wordpainting:

Bestselling writer Stephen King reading in the middle of a Red Sox baseball game. His team, the Red Sox, were losing, so he made the best of that time. The book he’s reading is Kate Atkinson’s book, When Will There Be Good News?

Red Phoenix by Kylie Chan
The second book in Australian author Kylie Chan’s ingenious urban fantasy saga; a tale of ancient gods and foul demons doing battle in the modern world, Red Phoenix combines Chinese mythology with martial arts, paranormal romance, and magic in a story that takes off like a rocket and never slows down. The action moves from Hong Kong to Europe as heroine Emma Donahoe finds a demonic circle of death closing around her and the people she loves: the breathtaking and powerful god she is bound to and his innocent young daughter whom Emma has sworn to protect. Red Phoenix is gripping globe-trotting adventure, urban fantasy, and Kung Fu all rolled into one spectacular package that fans of Lilith Saintcrow, Liz Williams, Karen Chance, Devon Monk, and Ilona Andrews are going to flip over.

Red Phoenix by Kylie Chan

The second book in Australian author Kylie Chan’s ingenious urban fantasy saga; a tale of ancient gods and foul demons doing battle in the modern world, Red Phoenix combines Chinese mythology with martial arts, paranormal romance, and magic in a story that takes off like a rocket and never slows down. The action moves from Hong Kong to Europe as heroine Emma Donahoe finds a demonic circle of death closing around her and the people she loves: the breathtaking and powerful god she is bound to and his innocent young daughter whom Emma has sworn to protect. Red Phoenix is gripping globe-trotting adventure, urban fantasy, and Kung Fu all rolled into one spectacular package that fans of Lilith Saintcrow, Liz Williams, Karen Chance, Devon Monk, and Ilona Andrews are going to flip over.

sildrotha:

There, I fixed the cover for them….

sildrotha:

There, I fixed the cover for them….

magickamazons:

Dark Slayer, written by NYTBS author Christine Feehan, is the latest book in her Carpathian Novel Series.
Oh my my, magic is abundant in this book; I think I became a witch while reading this book. As the sunny weather in California was eclipsed (Twilight Eclipse out on dvd now, just saying) with mysterious dark clouds containing a damp liquid substance.
What do you call this? Rain? This must be the work of witchcraft! ;) (via I Smell Sheep: December 2010)

magickamazons:

Dark Slayer, written by NYTBS author Christine Feehan, is the latest book in her Carpathian Novel Series.

Oh my my, magic is abundant in this book; I think I became a witch while reading this book. As the sunny weather in California was eclipsed (Twilight Eclipse out on dvd now, just saying) with mysterious dark clouds containing a damp liquid substance.

What do you call this? Rain? This must be the work of witchcraft! ;) (via I Smell Sheep: December 2010)

obsidian-sphere:

Art from the inside covers of the volumes of The New Junior Classic , PF Collier and Son, 1938 edition, and the books in the series.

My parents had this very collection! Have not thought about them for years, but seeing them again I remember them very well!

magickamazons:

"Mercedes Lackey returns to form in The Serpent’s Shadow, the fourth in her sequence of reimagined fairy tales. This story takes place in the London of 1909, and is based on "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."
Lackey creates echoes of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, pays affectionate homage to Dorothy Sayers’s Lord Peter Wimsey (who plays an important role under a thin disguise), and turns the dwarves into seven animal avatars who masquerade as pets of her Eurasian heroine, Maya.
Some of Maya’s challenges come from the fact that she is not “snow white,” and she has fled India for her father’s English homeland after the suspicious deaths of her parents. Establishing her household in London, she returns to her profession as a physician, working among the poor. Her “pets” and loyal servants stand guard, and Maya herself uses what bits of magic she managed to pick up in childhood to weave otherworldly defenses as well. But the implacable enemy who killed her parents has come to London to search for her; if Maya can be enslaved, her enormous potential powers can be used to the enemy’s ends.
Fortunately, English magicians of the White Lodge have also noted a new, powerful presence in their midst, though they’re having trouble locating her, too. They send Peter Scott, a Water Master, to track her down. He finds Maya beautiful and benign, and is determined to teach her to use the Western magic she is heir to, before her enemy discovers her.”

magickamazons:

"Mercedes Lackey returns to form in The Serpent’s Shadow, the fourth in her sequence of reimagined fairy tales. This story takes place in the London of 1909, and is based on "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."

Lackey creates echoes of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, pays affectionate homage to Dorothy Sayers’s Lord Peter Wimsey (who plays an important role under a thin disguise), and turns the dwarves into seven animal avatars who masquerade as pets of her Eurasian heroine, Maya.

Some of Maya’s challenges come from the fact that she is not “snow white,” and she has fled India for her father’s English homeland after the suspicious deaths of her parents. Establishing her household in London, she returns to her profession as a physician, working among the poor. Her “pets” and loyal servants stand guard, and Maya herself uses what bits of magic she managed to pick up in childhood to weave otherworldly defenses as well. But the implacable enemy who killed her parents has come to London to search for her; if Maya can be enslaved, her enormous potential powers can be used to the enemy’s ends.

Fortunately, English magicians of the White Lodge have also noted a new, powerful presence in their midst, though they’re having trouble locating her, too. They send Peter Scott, a Water Master, to track her down. He finds Maya beautiful and benign, and is determined to teach her to use the Western magic she is heir to, before her enemy discovers her.”

millionsmillions:

The big second-half 2014 preview is here at last, and it’s a doozy — with books by Haruki Murakami, David Mitchell, Ian McEwan, Marilynn Robinson, Denis Johnson, Hilary Mantel, Margaret Atwood, and 77 more.

millionsmillions:

The big second-half 2014 preview is here at last, and it’s a doozy — with books by Haruki Murakami, David Mitchell, Ian McEwan, Marilynn Robinson, Denis Johnson, Hilary Mantel, Margaret Atwood, and 77 more.

thehappysorceress:

dirtyriver:

captainahabsrarebooks:

New Arrivals: First American Edition of Raymond Chandler’s THE LADY IN THE LAKE (1943), published by Alfred A. Knopf.
Basis for the 1947 film noir directed by Robert Montgomery - the weakest adaptation of a Chandler novel into film, in my humble opinion.  But far and away, my favorite of Chandler’s novels.

Lady in the Lake is a peculiar movie, with its pov camera, but it’s a much better movie than people generally give it credit for.

It was the first Chandler film I remember seeing and it always stayed with me, for better or for worse.

thehappysorceress:

dirtyriver:

captainahabsrarebooks:

New Arrivals: First American Edition of Raymond Chandler’s THE LADY IN THE LAKE (1943), published by Alfred A. Knopf.

Basis for the 1947 film noir directed by Robert Montgomery - the weakest adaptation of a Chandler novel into film, in my humble opinion.  But far and away, my favorite of Chandler’s novels.

Lady in the Lake is a peculiar movie, with its pov camera, but it’s a much better movie than people generally give it credit for.

It was the first Chandler film I remember seeing and it always stayed with me, for better or for worse.

Tower Books T 338 _ 3rd print 1946 (by uk vintage)

Tower Books T 338 _ 3rd print 1946 

1946 3rd Print; Best Supernatural Stories by H.P. Lovecraft. Dust Jacket art by Leo Manso. Editor August Derleth

Tower Books T 338 _ 3rd print 1946 (by uk vintage)

Tower Books T 338 _ 3rd print 1946 

1946 3rd Print; Best Supernatural Stories by H.P. Lovecraft. Dust Jacket art by Leo Manso. Editor August Derleth

Steampunk Superhero: Mann’s Ghosts of Manhattan
George Mann’s new novel, Ghosts of Manhattan (available from Pyr Books), had me at its tag-line, “Introducing the World’s First Steampunk Superhero!” Two of my favorite genres in one–what an awesome concept! Also, unlike most steampunk today, this novel distinguishes itself by not being set in Victorian-era England but in the Roaring Twenties in Manhattan, circa 1927, not long before comic book superheroes would begin to emerge as a pop cultural force.
This novel’s Caped Crusader, the Ghost, is a hardcore blend of the darkest, non-superpowered superheroes, such as Batman and the Phantom, but ten times as gruesome in his tactics. He is vengeance and justice incarnate. (via Steampunk Superhero: Mann’s Ghosts of Manhattan — rob will review…)

Steampunk Superhero: Mann’s Ghosts of Manhattan

George Mann’s new novel, Ghosts of Manhattan (available from Pyr Books), had me at its tag-line, “Introducing the World’s First Steampunk Superhero!” Two of my favorite genres in one–what an awesome concept! Also, unlike most steampunk today, this novel distinguishes itself by not being set in Victorian-era England but in the Roaring Twenties in Manhattan, circa 1927, not long before comic book superheroes would begin to emerge as a pop cultural force.

This novel’s Caped Crusader, the Ghost, is a hardcore blend of the darkest, non-superpowered superheroes, such as Batman and the Phantom, but ten times as gruesome in his tactics. He is vengeance and justice incarnate. (via Steampunk Superhero: Mann’s Ghosts of Manhattan — rob will review…)

Two volumes from Mike Resnick’s Steampunk, Weird West, alternate world fantasy series featuring Doc Holiday, undead gunslingers, past super science and magic using Native Americans.