millionsmillions:

Is “literary” fiction just a product of clever marketing? Elizabeth Edmondson thinks it is. At The Guardian, she argues that classically literary authors like Jane Austen had no idea they were writing Literature — posterity classified their work as such later on. Her essay dovetails nicely with our own Edan Lepucki’s argument that literature is a genre.

millionsmillions:

Is “literary” fiction just a product of clever marketing? Elizabeth Edmondson thinks it is. At The Guardian, she argues that classically literary authors like Jane Austen had no idea they were writing Literature — posterity classified their work as such later on. Her essay dovetails nicely with our own Edan Lepucki’s argument that literature is a genre.

Farmer, Philip Jose - The Magic Labyrinth (1981 cover) (by sdobie)

Farmer, Philip Jose - The Magic Labyrinth (1981 cover) (by sdobie)

I have surprised myself recently, it seems for quite some time most of the books I’ve read have either been full size paperbacks, books borrowed from the library or on my Kindle.
Recently I started reading a regular size paperback and it seems it’s been so long since I read a book in the form that once was the only size I could afford  I am now actually finding it kind of awkward!
They just seen so small now!

Anyone else experienced anything like that?

I have surprised myself recently, it seems for quite some time most of the books I’ve read have either been full size paperbacks, books borrowed from the library or on my Kindle.

Recently I started reading a regular size paperback and it seems it’s been so long since I read a book in the form that once was the only size I could afford  I am now actually finding it kind of awkward!

They just seen so small now!

Anyone else experienced anything like that?

writersnoonereads:

No one reads the Queen of the Underworld (1850–1924).

In 1913, Sophie Lyons wrote her memoirs, chronicling six decades of bank robberies, prison breaks, cons, and swindles that left her a rich woman. One hundred years later, we’re [Combustion Books] bringing this important work back into print, casting back the veil of the 19th century criminal underworld. This is the world of fences and art thieves, bank sneaks and conwomen, but it is punctuated by a remarkable and nearly universal honor among thieves. Fully illustrated throughout with numerous diagrams of robbery methods and ways of concealing stolen valuables.

via Brickbat Books (my favorite Philadelphia bookstore)
@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

writersnoonereads:

No one reads the Queen of the Underworld (1850–1924).

In 1913, Sophie Lyons wrote her memoirs, chronicling six decades of bank robberies, prison breaks, cons, and swindles that left her a rich woman. One hundred years later, we’re [Combustion Books] bringing this important work back into print, casting back the veil of the 19th century criminal underworld. This is the world of fences and art thieves, bank sneaks and conwomen, but it is punctuated by a remarkable and nearly universal honor among thieves. Fully illustrated throughout with numerous diagrams of robbery methods and ways of concealing stolen valuables.

via Brickbat Books (my favorite Philadelphia bookstore)

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

michaelmoonsbookshop:

Supermind

1963 Pyramid Books edition

Mark Phillips it seems was the pseudonym used by two people writing together by the names of Randall Garrett and Laurence Janifer for a thee part series called Psi-Powers.

They can now all be had for free via Kindle. 

(via tinyhorsez)

Fabrice Boulanger has adapted and illustrated Frankenstein and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, two novels not intended for children, as children’s books.

From June 1933, this was the fourth issue. It’s great fun. Dent’s writing style is very melodramatic and dime-novel influenced, full of unnecessary exclamation marks and flowery descriptions but it also crackles with energy, creative details and enthusiasm.
I can see how a new reader picking up this novel either in the original pulp or the Bantam reprint would be hooked and want to find some more Doc stories.
The story has a suspenseful submarine voyage to the Arctic, an ice-covered ocean liner abandoned for fifteen years (with a room full of murdered passengers, perfecly preserved by the cold) and a puzzling mystery about millions of dollars in gold and diamonds— the clue to the treasure’s location is somehow concealed on the back of a blind violinist (!).
But probably what most readers remember best is Doc’s barehanded fight with a polar bear. It’s one of those wildly improbable heroic feats that you just have to accept and enjoy,
like Tarzan killing a lion with a knife. The bear on the cover of the Bantam paperback is just enormous; his head alone is bigger than Doc’s body. (via Dr Hermes MORE RETRO-SCANS)

From June 1933, this was the fourth issue. It’s great fun. Dent’s writing style is very melodramatic and dime-novel influenced, full of unnecessary exclamation marks and flowery descriptions but it also crackles with energy, creative details and enthusiasm.

I can see how a new reader picking up this novel either in the original pulp or the Bantam reprint would be hooked and want to find some more Doc stories.

The story has a suspenseful submarine voyage to the Arctic, an ice-covered ocean liner abandoned for fifteen years (with a room full of murdered passengers, perfecly preserved by the cold) and a puzzling mystery about millions of dollars in gold and diamonds— the clue to the treasure’s location is somehow concealed on the back of a blind violinist (!).

But probably what most readers remember best is Doc’s barehanded fight with a polar bear. It’s one of those wildly improbable heroic feats that you just have to accept and enjoy,

like Tarzan killing a lion with a knife. The bear on the cover of the Bantam paperback is just enormous; his head alone is bigger than Doc’s body. (via Dr Hermes MORE RETRO-SCANS)

From 1953, where it appeared in GALAXY in three installments, this has always been one of my favorite Isaac Asimov books, if not indeed my absolute favorite. Asimov himself in his introduction seemed pleased that THE CAVES OF STEEL first successfully combined science-fiction with a mystery plot, but I think he might have missed the real truth here.
Actually, nearly all of Asimov’s fiction and certainly his robot stories were essentially mysteries. It’s why I love ‘em. He set up his futuristic stage, explained the Three Laws of Robotics, and gave us a situation where the robots seemed to be acting irrationally.
After that, it was a contest between reader and author to figure out exactly what was going on. Asimov’s stories were not swashbuckling adventure or hair-raising horror tales, they were basically puzzles which we tried to solve. (via Dr Hermes MORE RETRO-SCANS)

From 1953, where it appeared in GALAXY in three installments, this has always been one of my favorite Isaac Asimov books, if not indeed my absolute favorite. Asimov himself in his introduction seemed pleased that THE CAVES OF STEEL first successfully combined science-fiction with a mystery plot, but I think he might have missed the real truth here.

Actually, nearly all of Asimov’s fiction and certainly his robot stories were essentially mysteries. It’s why I love ‘em. He set up his futuristic stage, explained the Three Laws of Robotics, and gave us a situation where the robots seemed to be acting irrationally.

After that, it was a contest between reader and author to figure out exactly what was going on. Asimov’s stories were not swashbuckling adventure or hair-raising horror tales, they were basically puzzles which we tried to solve. (via Dr Hermes MORE RETRO-SCANS)

From September 1970, this was the first in a series of psychic detective novels by Frank Lauria (born 1935). Others followed over the years - RAGA SIX, BARON ORGAZ, LADY SATIVA, THE PRIESTESS and THE SETH PAPERS. In fact, as recently as 1991 Dr Orient appeared in BLUE LIMBO and since Lauria has had further books published in the last few years, maybe the Doc’s career still has a few kicks left in it.
The series stars Dr Owen Orient, an actual surgeon and psychiatrist who has dropped his medical practice to concentrate on his spiritual research. Orient studied for years in the mountains of Tibet, mastering telepathy and astral projection, returning to the Western world to bring his serene knowledge where it was most needed. He lives with a loyal manservant named Sordi, has a loose group of students and disciples, and dedicates himself to training gifted ones and (when necessary) fighting negative energy.
Well, this is a perfectly sound foundation for a mystic adventure series, and it has worked just fine for Mandrake the Magician, Dr Strange, the Green Lama and many more. Lauria makes Orient believable by limiting his powers. He’s skilled in telepathy but within reasonable limits; he can’t levitate out the window or cast illusions to trick gunmen or anything like that. He’s also accessible as a personalty, being serious and dedicated but not overbearing.
Orient comes across as thoughtful and honest, not hesitating to admit his limits or ask for advice. He feels very much like someone you could trust if you were being swamped by malevolent psychic energy. On the other hand, although enlightened, he’s not above feeling doubt or uncertainty. (via Dr Hermes MORE RETRO-SCANS)

From September 1970, this was the first in a series of psychic detective novels by Frank Lauria (born 1935). Others followed over the years - RAGA SIX, BARON ORGAZ, LADY SATIVA, THE PRIESTESS and THE SETH PAPERS. In fact, as recently as 1991 Dr Orient appeared in BLUE LIMBO and since Lauria has had further books published in the last few years, maybe the Doc’s career still has a few kicks left in it.

The series stars Dr Owen Orient, an actual surgeon and psychiatrist who has dropped his medical practice to concentrate on his spiritual research. Orient studied for years in the mountains of Tibet, mastering telepathy and astral projection, returning to the Western world to bring his serene knowledge where it was most needed. He lives with a loyal manservant named Sordi, has a loose group of students and disciples, and dedicates himself to training gifted ones and (when necessary) fighting negative energy.

Well, this is a perfectly sound foundation for a mystic adventure series, and it has worked just fine for Mandrake the Magician, Dr Strange, the Green Lama and many more. Lauria makes Orient believable by limiting his powers. He’s skilled in telepathy but within reasonable limits; he can’t levitate out the window or cast illusions to trick gunmen or anything like that. He’s also accessible as a personalty, being serious and dedicated but not overbearing.

Orient comes across as thoughtful and honest, not hesitating to admit his limits or ask for advice. He feels very much like someone you could trust if you were being swamped by malevolent psychic energy. On the other hand, although enlightened, he’s not above feeling doubt or uncertainty. (via Dr Hermes MORE RETRO-SCANS)

Sherlock Holmes remains as popular, and as fascinating, now as he ever did. Now, in this beautiful and lavishly illustrated book, Daniel Smith explores Sherlock Holmes and his world in every engrossing respect. The Sherlock Holmes Companion, a witty and informed text, provides plot summaries of every single Sherlock Holmes story, in the order in which they were written, and with good-humored and even waspish assessments of their relative merits. There are compact biographies of Holmes, Moriarty, Watson, and Conan Doyle—whose own life and earnest preoccupations remain of enduring interest. The book contains many original interviews with some of the actors who’ve played Holmes, or written film or television scripts about him, over the years as well as a comprehensive chronology of all the thespians to attempt a portrayal of Holmes, from Basil Rathbone and Jeremy Brett to Stewart Granger.

If you want to know the different kinds of firearms ever toted by Holmes, or when he first took to sporting a deerstalker, or how often the examination of footprints facilitated the successful solution of a case, or when Roger Moore played Holmes or Robert Duvall Watson and why, then this book is for you. 
Plus this book also has a listing, with a review, of all the original stories by Conan Doyle in the order they were published.

Sherlock Holmes remains as popular, and as fascinating, now as he ever did. Now, in this beautiful and lavishly illustrated book, Daniel Smith explores Sherlock Holmes and his world in every engrossing respect. The Sherlock Holmes Companion, a witty and informed text, provides plot summaries of every single Sherlock Holmes story, in the order in which they were written, and with good-humored and even waspish assessments of their relative merits. There are compact biographies of Holmes, Moriarty, Watson, and Conan Doyle—whose own life and earnest preoccupations remain of enduring interest. The book contains many original interviews with some of the actors who’ve played Holmes, or written film or television scripts about him, over the years as well as a comprehensive chronology of all the thespians to attempt a portrayal of Holmes, from Basil Rathbone and Jeremy Brett to Stewart Granger.

If you want to know the different kinds of firearms ever toted by Holmes, or when he first took to sporting a deerstalker, or how often the examination of footprints facilitated the successful solution of a case, or when Roger Moore played Holmes or Robert Duvall Watson and why, then this book is for you. 

Plus this book also has a listing, with a review, of all the original stories by Conan Doyle in the order they were published.

dirtyriver:

ruckawriter:

It was about eleven o’clock in the morning, mid October, with the sun not shining and a look of hard wet rain in the clearness of the foothills. I was wearing my powder-blue suit, with dark blue shirt, tie and display handkerchief, black brogues, black wool socks with dark little clocks on them. I was neat, clean, shaved and sober, and I didn’t care who knew it. I was everything the well-dressed private detective ought to be. I was calling on four million dollars.
The opening to The Big Sleep.
Unsure of the illustration credit. Perhaps Wayne Barker?

Tom Adams. See all his Chandler covers here.

dirtyriver:

ruckawriter:

It was about eleven o’clock in the morning, mid October, with the sun not shining and a look of hard wet rain in the clearness of the foothills. I was wearing my powder-blue suit, with dark blue shirt, tie and display handkerchief, black brogues, black wool socks with dark little clocks on them. I was neat, clean, shaved and sober, and I didn’t care who knew it. I was everything the well-dressed private detective ought to be. I was calling on four million dollars.

The opening to The Big Sleep.

Unsure of the illustration credit. Perhaps Wayne Barker?

Tom Adams. See all his Chandler covers here.

(via thehappysorceress)

thehappysorceress:

The Time Machine by Mike Mahle
From the upcoming RockPaperBooks Kickstarter


Long in the long ago this was the third book I read.

The first and second being Through the Looking Glass and The Adventures of Robin Hood.

thehappysorceress:

The Time Machine by Mike Mahle

From the upcoming RockPaperBooks Kickstarter

Long in the long ago this was the third book I read.

The first and second being Through the Looking Glass and The Adventures of Robin Hood.

npr:

explore-blog:

Neurocomic, a graphic novel about how the brain works – exactly as fantastic as it sounds.

Does this remind anyone else of ‘The Magic School Bus?’ I bet Mrs. Frizzle would love this book. — LK 

npr:

explore-blog:

Neurocomic, a graphic novel about how the brain works – exactly as fantastic as it sounds.

Does this remind anyone else of ‘The Magic School Bus?’ I bet Mrs. Frizzle would love this book. — LK