weirdletter:

The Dead Valley and Others: H.P. Lovecraft’s Favorite Horror Stories Vol. 2, edited by S.T. Joshi, Dark Renaissance Books, 2014. Info: darkrenaissance.com.
"Each story is hand picked by Lovecraftian scholar S.T. Joshi, with introduction. H.P. Lovecraft was a voracious reader of supernatural and fantastic fiction, and he was continually on the hunt for powerful and stimulating works in these genres. Many of the stories he read directly influenced his own writings. Here is the second volume in the very popular Lovecraft’s Favorite series. 100 signed and numbered trade paperback edition. Signed by S.T. Joshi."
Contents: Introduction by S. T. Joshi The Diamond Lens by Fitz-James O’Brien The Horla by Guy de Maupassant The Moon Pool by A. Merritt Count Magnus by M. R. James The Damned Thing by Ambrose Bierce The Dead Valley by Ralph Adams Cram The Bad Lands by John Metcalfe Ooze by Anthony M. Rud Fishhead by Irvin S. Cobb The Harbor-Master by Robert W. Chambers Ancient Sorceries by Algernon Blackwood Cassius by Henry S. Whitehead The Spider by Hanns Heinz Ewers Blind Man’s Buff by H. Russell Wakefield

weirdletter:

The Dead Valley and Others: H.P. Lovecraft’s Favorite Horror Stories Vol. 2, edited by S.T. Joshi, Dark Renaissance Books, 2014. Info: darkrenaissance.com.

"Each story is hand picked by Lovecraftian scholar S.T. Joshi, with introduction. H.P. Lovecraft was a voracious reader of supernatural and fantastic fiction, and he was continually on the hunt for powerful and stimulating works in these genres. Many of the stories he read directly influenced his own writings. Here is the second volume in the very popular Lovecraft’s Favorite series. 100 signed and numbered trade paperback edition. Signed by S.T. Joshi."

Contents:
Introduction by S. T. Joshi
The Diamond Lens by Fitz-James O’Brien
The Horla by Guy de Maupassant
The Moon Pool by A. Merritt
Count Magnus by M. R. James
The Damned Thing by Ambrose Bierce
The Dead Valley by Ralph Adams Cram
The Bad Lands by John Metcalfe
Ooze by Anthony M. Rud
Fishhead by Irvin S. Cobb
The Harbor-Master by Robert W. Chambers
Ancient Sorceries by Algernon Blackwood
Cassius by Henry S. Whitehead
The Spider by Hanns Heinz Ewers
Blind Man’s Buff by H. Russell Wakefield

alternateworldcomics:

Recently published book Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine by Tim Hanley is an interesting book that recounts the history of the character of Wonder Woman from the golden age to the most recent developments in the character while also taking into account other things such as the character of her creator William Moulton Marston including a long review of his novel Venus With Us, and aside about other female comic characters such as The Emerald Empress.

One thing he brought up that had never occurred to me was that one of the reasons that Hollywood might be standoffish about making a Wonder Woman movie, other than the ones everyone knows, is that unlike Superman and Batman there aren’t really any iconic Wonder Woman stories they can use as it’s basis that the general public would get. It’s a thought. 

alternateworldcomics:

Recently published book Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine by Tim Hanley is an interesting book that recounts the history of the character of Wonder Woman from the golden age to the most recent developments in the character while also taking into account other things such as the character of her creator William Moulton Marston including a long review of his novel Venus With Us, and aside about other female comic characters such as The Emerald Empress.

One thing he brought up that had never occurred to me was that one of the reasons that Hollywood might be standoffish about making a Wonder Woman movie, other than the ones everyone knows, is that unlike Superman and Batman there aren’t really any iconic Wonder Woman stories they can use as it’s basis that the general public would get. It’s a thought. 

weirdletter:

The Weiser Book of Horror and the Occult: Hidden Magic, Occult Truths, and the Stories That Started It All. Edited by Lon Milo DuQuette, Weiser Books, 2014. Cover art by Symonenko Viktoriia/Shutterstock, interior art by Maureen Forys, Happenstance Type-O-Rama. Info: redwheelweiser.com.
"Looking for a thoughtful fright? Or perhaps a frightful thought? Packed with stories selected by one of today’s leading esoteric scholars, this book will do more than make your toes curl and your skin crawl. These tales reveal hidden truths, inspire forbidden pursuits, and divulge the secrets of magical initiation in the guise of fiction. Covering topics from rituals to hauntings to Satanism, this one-of-a-kind volume includes selections from Aleister Crowley, Ambrose Bierce, Arthur Machen, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert W. Chambers, Ralph Adams Cram, H.P. Lovecraft, Dion Fortune, Sir Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, Bram Stoker. As DuQuette writes in his introduction, horror takes its time. It creeps in, seeps in, and lingers. These stories will take you hours to read, but they will stay with you, biting at your heels from the shadows, eternally. Don’t say we didn’t warn you…" Contents: Horror Takes Its Time, an Introduction by Lon Milo DuQuette The House and the Brain by Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton Casting the Runes by Montague Rhodes James Luella Miller by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman An Inhabitant of Carcosa by Ambrose Bierce No. 252 Rue M. Le Prince by Ralph Adams Cram The Testament of Magdalen Blair by Aleister Crowley The Messenger by Robert W. Chambers The Ring of Thoth by Arthur Conan Doyle A Dream of Red Hands by Bram Stoker Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe At the Home of Poe by Frank Belknap Long, Jr. The Alchemist by H.P. Lovecraft Dickon the Devil by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu The White People by Arthur Machen The Sea Lure by Dion Fortune

weirdletter:

The Weiser Book of Horror and the Occult: Hidden Magic, Occult Truths, and the Stories That Started It All. Edited by Lon Milo DuQuette, Weiser Books, 2014. Cover art by Symonenko Viktoriia/Shutterstock, interior art by Maureen Forys, Happenstance Type-O-Rama. Info: redwheelweiser.com.

"Looking for a thoughtful fright? Or perhaps a frightful thought? Packed with stories selected by one of today’s leading esoteric scholars, this book will do more than make your toes curl and your skin crawl. These tales reveal hidden truths, inspire forbidden pursuits, and divulge the secrets of magical initiation in the guise of fiction. Covering topics from rituals to hauntings to Satanism, this one-of-a-kind volume includes selections from Aleister Crowley, Ambrose Bierce, Arthur Machen, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert W. Chambers, Ralph Adams Cram, H.P. Lovecraft, Dion Fortune, Sir Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, Bram Stoker. As DuQuette writes in his introduction, horror takes its time. It creeps in, seeps in, and lingers. These stories will take you hours to read, but they will stay with you, biting at your heels from the shadows, eternally. Don’t say we didn’t warn you…"

Contents:
Horror Takes Its Time, an Introduction by Lon Milo DuQuette
The House and the Brain by Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton
Casting the Runes by Montague Rhodes James
Luella Miller by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
An Inhabitant of Carcosa by Ambrose Bierce
No. 252 Rue M. Le Prince by Ralph Adams Cram
The Testament of Magdalen Blair by Aleister Crowley
The Messenger by Robert W. Chambers
The Ring of Thoth by Arthur Conan Doyle
A Dream of Red Hands by Bram Stoker
Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe
At the Home of Poe by Frank Belknap Long, Jr.
The Alchemist by H.P. Lovecraft
Dickon the Devil by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
The White People by Arthur Machen
The Sea Lure by Dion Fortune

weirdletter:

The Weird Company. The Secret History of H. P. Lovecraft’s Twentieth Century, by Pete Rawlik, Night Shade Books, 2014. Cover art by David Hueso, info: nightshadebooks.com.
"Shoggoths attack in this adrenaline-pumping novel set in the world of H. P. Lovecraft, where the horrors of the cosmos know no limits… It was in a way humanoid, as it stood on two legs and possessed two arms that ended in delicate digits that I would dare to call hands. Its skin was a pale blue, like the eggs of a robin, and curiously dry looking. The head was massive with a huge bulbous cranium, a large lipless mouth, and three blood red eyes that stared out at the world with nothing but hate. When it opened its mouth to speak it issued forth the most horrendous of sounds, something empty and hollow, like the wind blowing through a dead tree, and it made me cringe to hear it… The story of Dr. Hartwell (Reanimators) continues, but now he has company. Weird company: a witch, a changeling, a mad scientist, and a poet trapped in the form of a beast. These are not heroes but monsters… monsters to fight monsters. Their adventures rage across the globe, from the mountains and long-forgotten caves of Antarctica to the dimly lit backstreets of Innsmouth that still hold terrifying secrets. The unholy creatures released upon the world via the ill-fated Lake expedition to Antarctica must be stopped. And only the weird company stands in their way. Continuing in the fashion of Reanimators, The Weird Company finds Lovecraft expert Pete Rawlik taking some of the most well-known of H. P. Lovecraft’s creations and creating a true Frankenstein monster of a story—a tale more horrific than anything Lovecraft could have imagined…"

weirdletter:

The Weird Company. The Secret History of H. P. Lovecraft’s Twentieth Century, by Pete Rawlik, Night Shade Books, 2014. Cover art by David Hueso, info: nightshadebooks.com.

"Shoggoths attack in this adrenaline-pumping novel set in the world of H. P. Lovecraft, where the horrors of the cosmos know no limits… It was in a way humanoid, as it stood on two legs and possessed two arms that ended in delicate digits that I would dare to call hands. Its skin was a pale blue, like the eggs of a robin, and curiously dry looking. The head was massive with a huge bulbous cranium, a large lipless mouth, and three blood red eyes that stared out at the world with nothing but hate. When it opened its mouth to speak it issued forth the most horrendous of sounds, something empty and hollow, like the wind blowing through a dead tree, and it made me cringe to hear it… The story of Dr. Hartwell (Reanimators) continues, but now he has company. Weird company: a witch, a changeling, a mad scientist, and a poet trapped in the form of a beast. These are not heroes but monsters… monsters to fight monsters. Their adventures rage across the globe, from the mountains and long-forgotten caves of Antarctica to the dimly lit backstreets of Innsmouth that still hold terrifying secrets. The unholy creatures released upon the world via the ill-fated Lake expedition to Antarctica must be stopped. And only the weird company stands in their way. Continuing in the fashion of Reanimators, The Weird Company finds Lovecraft expert Pete Rawlik taking some of the most well-known of H. P. Lovecraft’s creations and creating a true Frankenstein monster of a story—a tale more horrific than anything Lovecraft could have imagined…"

(via erotiterrorist)

trudiscordianism:

Say…. you know Discordia would be a good name for a novel or book of short stories…. There already is one?

Three!

Discordia by Morgana Gallaway

http://bookinglyyours.blogspot.com/2012/02/book-review-discordia-by-morgana.html

Discordia by Dena K. Salmon

http://downrightdystopian.blogspot.com/2013/06/book-review-discordia-eleventh.html

Discordia by Lauren Hodge

http://www.thediscordtrilogy.com/discordia_golden_apple_novella/

nprbooks:

In honor of Banned Books Week, here are the top 10 challenged books of 2013.

This is the second year Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants series has topped the list. He tells NPR’s Lynn Neary:

"I don’t consider the books to be anti-authoritarian, but I do think it is important, if you think something is wrong, to question authority — because, you know, there are villains in real life, and they don’t always wear black capes and black hats. Sometimes they’re dressed like authority figures. And kids need to know that it’s important to question them."

dirtyriver:

powells:

Banned Books Week starts today! How many of these banned books have you read?

Or, an history of stupidity in the US.

dirtyriver:

powells:

Banned Books Week starts today! How many of these banned books have you read?

Or, an history of stupidity in the US.

(via thehappysorceress)

michaelallanleonard:

Across the awesome darkness comes the cold, red kiss of … THE SPACE VAMPIRES!
Couldn’t find artist credit, 1976.  Apparently there’s a TV show based on this in the works, and it was already adapted as a Tobe hooper film, Lifeforce, in 1985.

michaelallanleonard:

Across the awesome darkness comes the cold, red kiss of … THE SPACE VAMPIRES!

Couldn’t find artist credit, 1976.  Apparently there’s a TV show based on this in the works, and it was already adapted as a Tobe hooper film, Lifeforce, in 1985.

thehappysorceress:

Banned Books Week 2014 poster by Paul Sizer
Prints available at October Kalamazoo Art Hop

thehappysorceress:

Banned Books Week 2014 poster by Paul Sizer

Prints available at October Kalamazoo Art Hop

kadrey:

Here I am talking Sandman Slim on Cripple & Broken TV. Sorry about the hat. My hair was kind of anarchic that day.